10 unusual love idioms from all around the world, illustrated

10 unusual love idioms from all around the world, illustrated

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Image by Ellie Walton @ Ellie Walton Illustrations

Ever wondered what whimsical ways people around the world have of expressing their feelings or talking about love? You might be surprised by how many unusual (and not very romantic, if taken out of context) love idioms there are out there.

Most of the meanings of these idioms are strongly connected to the culture of their country of origin, and they may make sense to one who belongs to that culture and knows the history, but not to you.

Still, it’s funny to try and guess where foreign idioms of any kind come from. Thus, illustrator Elly Walton was inspired to produce a series of illustrated love idioms from all around the world, in an attempt to make sense of one of the most unusual, yet romantic idioms she found. Here are ten of them:

1. “To fall like a pine tree” (Sweden) means “love at first sight”

Elly Walton Illustrations
Elly Walton Illustrations

2. “A flower on a high peak” (Japan) means “an unobtainable object of desire”

Elly Walton Illustrations

3. “The tomatoes have faded” (Russia) means “the love has gone”

Elly Walton Illustrations

4. “A piece of the moon” (Hindi) means “a beautiful person”

Elly Walton Illustrations

5. “To drag a wing” (Portugal) means “to woo”

Elly Walton Illustrations

6. “Dry firewood meets a flame” (China) means “instant attraction”

Elly Walton Illustration

7. “To bite the metal sheet” (Greece) means “to have a crush”

Elly Walton Illustrations
Elly Walton Illustrations

8. “To have seen the green bird” (Brazil) means “to smile because you’re falling in love”

Elly Walton Illustrations

9. “Re-headed cabbage” (Italy) means “a re-kindled romance”

Elly Walton Ilustrations
Elly Walton Illustrations

10. “Like hibiscus rising out of water” (China) means “a graceful woman”

Elly Walton Illustrations

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